Steroid cream psoriasis

Last year I developed a rash under my eyes and I was promptly prescribed hydrocortisone cream. It didn't help much and the doctor referred me to see a dermatologist. I was told to keep using the hydrocortisone and I was discharged. As the steroid cream didn't help I searched the internet for another remedy and that's how I came across a product called Magicream. It claims it only contains natural ingredients and it promised to clear up my rash. I was so excited! I have recently found out that the cream in fact contains Clobetasol Propionate and Ketoconazole. I was devastated to find this out especially since side effects include red spots and a burning sensation! When I stopped using the cream the side effects were terrible - I don't need to tell you as you know how the withdrawal of steroid can affect ones face. I then did a search on line and found your website which made so much sense and helped me to understand what was happening with my skin. I ordered the Face & Body Wash and the Face & Neck TheraCream and I have been symptom FREE ever since. Thank you from a once frustrated person!! Trish Managold, UK

*Results may vary. If you are pregnant, nursing, taking other medications, have a serious medical condition, or have a history of heart conditions we suggest consulting with a physician before using any supplements. The information contained in this Website is provided for general informational purposes only. It is not intended as and should not be relied upon as medical advice. The information may not apply to you and before you use any of the information provided in the site, you should contact a qualified medical, dietary, fitness or other appropriate professional. If you utilize any information provided in this site, you do so at your own risk and you specifically waive any right to make any claim against the author and publisher of this Website and materials as the result of the use of such information.

PUVA is a special treatment using a photosensitizing drug and timed artificial-light exposure composed of wavelengths of ultraviolet light in the UVA spectrum. The photosensitizing drug in PUVA is called psoralen. Both the psoralen and the UVA light must be administered within one hour of each other for a response to occur. These treatments are usually given in a physician's office two to three times per week. Several weeks of PUVA is usually required before seeing significant results. The light exposure time is gradually increased during each subsequent treatment. Psoralens may be given orally as a pill or topically as a bath or lotion. After a short incubation period, the skin is exposed to a special wavelength of ultraviolet light called UVA. Patients using PUVA are generally sun sensitive and must avoid sun exposure for a period of time after PUVA. Common side effects with PUVA include burning, aging of the skin, increased brown spots called lentigines , and an increased risk of skin cancer , including melanoma . The relative increase in skin cancer risk with PUVA treatment is controversial. PUVA treatments need to be closely monitored by a physician and discontinued when a maximum number of treatments have been reached.

Steroid cream psoriasis

steroid cream psoriasis

Media:

steroid cream psoriasissteroid cream psoriasissteroid cream psoriasissteroid cream psoriasissteroid cream psoriasis

http://buy-steroids.org